The single dose of Amoxicillin for strep throat allows you to return to school the next day

The majority of students with group A streptococcal pharyngitis treated with a single dose of Amoxil (Amoxicillin) were negative for the infection in 24 hours, making them able to return to school the next day, according to a recent study.

“The purpose of this study was to re-evaluate the need for 24-hour antibiotic treatment for group A streptococcal pharyngitis before allowing return to school,” researcher Richard H. Schwartz, MD, of the pediatric department of Inova Children’s Hospital, Falls Church, Virginia, and colleagues wrote. “We conclude that all children treated with Amoxil for streptococcal pharyngitis at 5 p.m., if they are afebrile and improved, can be allowed to attend school on day 2.”

To determine whether a single dose of amoxicillin (50 mg / kg) actually decreased streptococcal pharyngitis, the investigator analyzed a cohort of 111 children aged 2 to 17 years with a sore throat plus a positive antigen rapid screening test. The cohort was divided into patients who received only an initial dose of amoxicillin prior to a return visit the following day (n = 51) and patients receiving a second dose of amoxicillin 1 hour prior to visiting the investigators the next day = 60).

The results of the study showed that after follow-up, only 9% of the patients tested positive for streptococcal pharyngitis. There were six failures in the group that received the second dose before being tested on day 2 and four failures in the group who did not. Of these 10 patients, seven had a significant decrease in strep throat after a second throat culture.

Schwartz and colleagues suggested that these findings be used to change state regulations requiring a 24-hour treatment period before allowing students to return to school after a positive culture for strep throat. These changes could affect the lives of families without access to child care in emergencies, the researchers said.

“The potential for significant financial savings and improved school attendance, as well as the potential reduction in sick leave for a parent working outside the home, can be significant,” the researchers wrote. – by David Costill